How To Repurpose Great Copy You Already Have

When you have a piece of copy that works really well, you shouldn’t just use it once and move on. No, friends; when you find the magical combination of words that make your sales go through the roof, you should slather them all over every piece of marketing material that you have.

Don’t just start regurgitating, though – spread your golden words purposefully – intentionally – so that you can amass the greatest impact possible from your work. Want to know how? I’ll show you…

The Example

Let’s start by exploring one piece of copy that you can repurpose over and over again. For our example, we’ll use my website. Check out the front page:

This one piece of copy already includes emotionally-driven language, a promise of what can be, and a call to action. How can we re-use this?

If you notice in the navigation bar, my website has a blog. For some of my blog articles, I could talk about:

  • How great marketing can propel a business forward
  • What makes a great marketing campaign great
  • What “passive income” means
  • How a great copywriter can help you prepare and launch a passive income product
  • How copywriting shows off a brand’s true identity
  • How copywriting can help you to make a difference in the world
  • What makes my business the right place for you to start marketing your business

See how I did that? From two sentences, I was able to create seven blog post titles to carry me through almost two months of blogging.

I could also use those articles as LinkedIn articles that link back to my website, or guest blog on another marketer’s website.

Those seven topics can also be podcast topics for my own podcast, or for a guest talk on someone else’s podcasts. With a little work, the last topic – how I can help you – can be written both as a blog and as a sales page.

From this one page on my website – and using only two sentences from that page – I have an opportunity for at least (if not way more than) 22 spin-off pieces of content to reach potential clients on my website, other blogs, my podcast, other podcasts, social media, and through sales pages.

In order to maximize your ability to share the content, though, you have to keep Google’s “search spiders” in mind.

If all you do is share the same blog article on your site, a friend’s site, social media, and through a landing page, Google will shut down searches to your content so fast your head will spin.

You have to change your content, tweaking the verbiage or the angle of the article just a bit, so that it’s uniquely relevant to the platform on which you’re placing it. 

If you don’t change your content at all, it won’t get noticed. But even changing each piece 10%-20% will enable you to further your reach exponentially using the same basic ideas. 

The real point with repurposing content is that you aren’t repurposing simply to provide one more way to get noticed. You’re repurposing your content to better reach the audience of each platform on which your content lives, whether that be social media, a landing page, or a podcast.

By shifting the language you use, the specific points you make, and the data you cite, you appeal to different members of the audience, which allows you to persuade more people than if you just make the point once and move forward.

The Process

So how did we use two sentences on one page of my website to create so much new copywriting material?

You have to look closely, at more than just the words, and think about the value that every word is lending to the piece overall. 

In our example, the first sentence reads, “Are you ready to rev up your business with some seriously hot marketing?” It’s a simple sentence that’s easy to read, but in order to be persuaded by it, your audience has to already assume or agree with a couple of things:

  1. Marketing will help “rev up” their business.
  2. They want to grow their business; not just continue at the same level they are currently operating.
  3. I know what I’m talking about regarding marketing that’s “hot.”
  4. The kind of marketing techniques I’m purporting to use are actually “hot” – they’re not the same techniques every marketer uses.

In business, as in life, we never assume. I think you know why. That’s why this sentence gives me four great opportunities to flesh out my own content marketing with articles that address the assumptions I’m asking my audience to make. 

Take a look at your website now. What assumptions are you asking your audience to make?

Try to view your website and your business from a complete outsider’s point of view, a child’s point of view even.

What questions might a seven-year-old ask about the words written on the homepage of your own website? Let’s take a look at another website for a different example.

This is Maid Complete, a residential cleaning company that operates in Denver, Colorado.

How many assumptions can you find on the front page? Take a minute and write them down. 

Here are the assumptions I found:

  1. People looking for home cleaning want service as soon as possible – the same week.
  2. Customers want to save both time and money when booking a home cleaning company.
  3. Customers prefer a flat rate price that guarantees work delivered regardless of how many hours the job takes.
  4. Customers are concerned about the safety of booking services online.

There are a couple more assumptions, too. Can you find them?

Each of these assumptions is an opportunity for a copywriting job, whether that be an article placed on social media sites to address residential cleaning services with quick turnaround times, or a separate sales page that details the company’s flat rate policy and the effect that this policy has on the value of their service.

On every website you visit, each word is an opportunity for more words. The same is true on your own website.

Every promise that you make; every piece of value that you offer; every assumption you ask your customers to believe is an opportunity for a blog post, podcast talk, or social media blurb. Fleshing out your own marketing is easy once you look closely at what you already offer.

Try some of the tips out on your next project, and email me to let me know how it goes! Or, post your results on my Facebook page to share with everyone. I’m looking forward to hearing from you.

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